The New Zealand Experiment

The New Zealand Experiment

A World Model for Structural Adjustment?

Jane Kelsey’s was a questioning and challenging voice when she wrote this passionate critique of New Zealand’s economic policies in the 1980s and 90s. The social and economic consequences of a decade of market-based reforms are laid bare in this statistically rich and rhetorically powerful work.

Drawing on a wide array of sources, Kelsey’s analysis delves into every aspect of the structural reforms that were to have such vast consequences for New Zealand society. Her analysis of those policies and their consequences gains a fresh – and sobering – perspective in the light of the recent global financial crisis.

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Table of contents

Preface
Introduction

1. Setting the Scene
2. Capturing the Political Machine
3. Empowering the Technocrats
4. Embedding the New Regime
5. Market and Trade Liberalisation
6. Limiting the State
7. Monetary Policy
8. Labour Market Deregulation
9. Fiscal Restraint
10. The Economic Deficit
11. The Social Deficit
12. The Democratic Deficit
13. The Cultural Deficit
14. There Are Alternatives

Epilogue
Appendix: A manual for counter-technopols

Print publication:
Ebook publication: Dec 2015
Pages: 407
ISBN: 9781869401306
ISTC: A022012000021398
DOI: 10.7810/9781869401306

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Comment

'Jane Kelsey's New Zealand Experiment is cogent and persuasive. It sparks with a passionate anger at the disparate outcomes of the economic fundamentalist experience in Aotearoa New Zealand. This is the truth we have been waiting for.' Marilyn Waring

'If you feel uneasy about where we're heading, but like me sometimes suspect that no other course was realistic, read this book! Jane Kelsey not only provides a devastating analysis of the consequences of Rogernomics and its sequel; she also points the way towards a viable alternative.' Simon Collins, Editor, City Voice